Croftfoot ‘JJ’ mark on the stone

The mysterious "JJ" markings on my wall

The mysterious “JJ” markings on my wall

I’m always finding out something new about my home in High Blantyre. Yesterday was no exception. I live at Croftfoot, a 280 year old house that sits beside Kirkton Park. Whilst tidying up, I noticed for the first time, that initials were carved into one of the sandstone blocks on the wall. It would have originally been an outside wall, but is now part of the inside of the house since the mid 1990s.

The initials say “JJ” which I don’t believe were mason marks. The family that lived here for generations were the Jacksons and there is a strong liklihood, these initials were made by on of them. I can picture a child carving his or her initials into the back sandstone wall in years gone by.

Of course, I may be well of the mark here, but I can’t find any other explanation and the initials don’t sit well with the names of families who were here in the 1900s. The “JJ” mark is now in our living room and looks like I’ll need to research the Jackson family to find an answer.

Update: Looks like there was  JJ staying at Croftfoot. Helen Jackson emailed me to say, “Thomas 1808-1864 had a son James 1868-1942. A solicitor married to Margaret Agnes Reid. James is buried in the Jackson Lair along with my first great and second great grandparents. He was a step brother to my 2nd great grandfather as Thomas of Croftfoot ( my 3rd grt grandfather) first wife Margaret died in 1835. He married his second wife Jane Smellie in 1866. Hope this info answers your query. Helen”

Helen later added, “Hi Paul, I forgot also in the family there was a John born 1874, he later became a stockbroker and lived at Blantyre Park farm. Also there was a Janet 1877. Old Thomas was very productive with his second wife Jane, when they married Jane was 19 and he 58, they had 8 children all born at Croftfoot “

I cant imagine an adult defacing his home with initials, so if done as a child or teenager, the marks if they do belong to James Jackson, were likely made between 1875 – 1885.

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