Horse Drowns on Main Street

Yes, you did read that title correctly.

1905 High blantyre railwayIn September 1897 one Wednesday, a particularly long and prolonged spell of heavy rain caused considerable flooding throughout Blantyre Parish.

Damage to property was minimal with a baker having a number of bags of flour destroyed through water flooding his premises. However, things were a little more serious in High Blantyre Main Street, when a commotion causing much excitement happened at the bottom of Craigmuir Road Junction with Main Street, near the entrance to the Old Parish Church.

Pictured here around the same era , the commotion was to take place at Midday that Wednesday, on Main Street immediately underneath the old Railway Bridge and sadly it resulted in loss of life.

cartThe Public road where it passes at that point lies very low below the bridge. The dip can be seen quite clearly in the photo. That day, the drainage gratings were choked and as a result, all the water flowing down Main Street and down from the Stoneymeadow Road, collected in a pool of water below the bridge, some five foot deep.

A man traveled East had come down the Hill past Shott House from East Kilbride. He traveled with his horse and cart full of coal dross and decided the water wasn’t going to cause an obstruction, taking his cart into the flood. When they reached the deepest part at five foot, the horse almost entirely submerged panicked and stumbled, losing it’s footing. Falling to the side the cart tipped on it’s side, the horse trapped partially below the water, trapped in it’s harnesses and equipment and still tied to the fallen cart. The man was able to stand, just with water below his head and he struggled in vain to untie and save his horse. The animal sadly died, drowned by the flood.

The newspaper report also then goes on to tell that local children in High Blantyre, Stonefield and Springwell had to be carried over huge floods in order to get to schools.

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